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Halloween 2016

Learning4Fun:  Our Innovators

Ni4kids takes a closer look at three remarkable innovators who hailed from this small corner of the world but made a big global impact…

A new unique resource for primary schoolchildren entitled ‘Our Innovators: An Ulster-Scots Legacy ’, has been launched to examine the legacy of six local visionaries with Ulster-Scots connections.

The free online learning tool – which includes teacher guides, lesson plans and interactive material – is designed for Key Stage 2 pupils to explore the impact of some of the world’s greatest inventions, the effect of people on the natural and built environment, while also valuing and celebrating cultural diversity. Find out more at ourinnovators.com

Amy Carmichael (1867-1951)
Amy Beatrice Carmichael was a woman from Millisle, County Down, who dedicated her life to helping the poor of India. Despite ill health and an injury which left her mostly bed-ridden for the last 20 years of her life, Amy Carmichael served in India for 56 years, without a break, and wrote many books about missionary work. Amy’s hands-on approach to helping the lowest and most socially disadvantaged people in Indian society and her efforts to fit into the culture of the country where she worked was unusual at that time.
Amy Carmichael’s approach brought about social innovation in the way missionary work has been carried out since.


Lord Kelvin (1824-1907)
William Thomson was born in Belfast, and at a very young age he showed himself to be gifted in maths and science. He moved to Glasgow with his family as a boy and attended Glasgow University aged just 10. William later became a professor at Glasgow University and it was there that he spent most of his life studying and working. His innovations and contributions to science and engineering earned him the title of Lord Kelvin.
Lord Kelvin was a brilliant scientist and engineer whose innovations included the creation of the Kelvin scale and the laying of the transatlantic lines that allowed the first telegraph communications between Europe and North America.

Professor Frank Pantridge (1916-2004)
Frank Pantridge from Hillsborough was a doctor at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast, who became known as the Father of Emergency Medicine thanks to his invention of the first portable defibrillator. As a young man he served as an army medic in World War II and narrowly escaped death as a prisoner of war on the Siam Burma Railway. On returning to Belfast, Frank dedicated the rest of his life to helping others and became an expert in cardiac medicine.
Professor Pantridge’s innovation in creating a defibrillator, which could be taken to a patient in the case of an emergency, has saved countless lives across the world.


‘Our Innovators’ has been created by the e-learning team at Morrow Communications. It is funded by Northern Ireland Screen’s Ulster-Scots Broadcast Fund (USBF) and supported by the Ulster-Scots Agency and CCEA.


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